A Washingtonian favorite looks to be named one of Ireland’s greatest heritage sites

Who needs a permanent roof on to Scotland’s Gleneagles? Either you will in 2020, or you might need to build one on the 50th anniversary of Ireland’s greatest golf resort. Adare Manor was inducted…

A Washingtonian favorite looks to be named one of Ireland’s greatest heritage sites

Who needs a permanent roof on to Scotland’s Gleneagles? Either you will in 2020, or you might need to build one on the 50th anniversary of Ireland’s greatest golf resort.

Adare Manor was inducted into Ireland’s Hall of Fame last month, and the fabulous links-based site in County Clare, known for some of the largest men’s greens in the world, finally has a name.

It’s a name for a place that once sported golf legend Bobby Jones, a 14-handicap. In 1911, Jones, a U.S. president and a kingpin of American golf, sought out Adare to play golf. His patronage opened up the estate to the public. By 1914, the property had become a favorite of many international players, with players such as Francis Ouimet and Charles Blair Woods stopping by for playing practice rounds.

Then in October, 1922, the 100-room hotel was flooded and underwent its $1.4 million rebuild, according to legend. The design was completed the following month. (I’m assuming it was dry.)

It is the domestic roots of Adare Manor that will draw the interest of the United States Ryder Cup team in 2019. Geoff Ogilvy, an Ireland native and member of the U.S. team, has been vocal about Adare, on social media and in his book. It’s also not hard to guess the players will not like playing elsewhere.

But on Ireland’s 50th anniversary of its last major championship, the 1964 U.S. Open, Adare Manor has a great chance to show what the place can do to top Gleneagles.

Leave a Comment