Evan Coughlin: Why the Chicago Bears are no longer a dominant team

‘Chicago Bears’ Matt Nagy out of sync as his team unravels: It was good to watch Monday night. Nagy and Bears walk away with a defeat. Heading into the 2018 NFL regular season opener…

Evan Coughlin: Why the Chicago Bears are no longer a dominant team

‘Chicago Bears’ Matt Nagy out of sync as his team unravels: It was good to watch Monday night. Nagy and Bears walk away with a defeat.

Heading into the 2018 NFL regular season opener against the defending Super Bowl champion Philadelphia Eagles, many assumed the Bears would be a force to be reckoned with. Only a month ago, many were talking about how Chicago was in position to be among the league’s top six teams.

Turns out, Nagy and the Bears haven’t played a game yet.

The ineptitude in Chicago shows on every single play. The Bears are already sitting at 5-11 and will continue to slide.

It is well known that Nagy is an excellent offensive mind, but to expect him to instantly integrate a team that lost coordinators Vic Fangio and John Fox is not realistic.

Why does that matter to Bears fans and the Chicago media? Because we will hear most of the opinion from the player’s and media about what we missed out on in Nagy’s first season and all of their #RiseUp expectations.

Who are the guys who would’ve had the point of view to correctly predict the Bears’ season in an NFL season? No one, it’s clear. Not Fangio, not Fox, not Mitchell Trubisky, not coach Nagy.

Their minds probably weren’t on the Bears during the preseason or after all of the college football games in the early weeks of the year.

Brian Urlacher was right when he said “it’s easy to sit here and throw stats at us in May and say this is where the Bears are.”

Perhaps the media and fans should take it upon themselves to focus on something other than what is clearly out of sync with this current team.

Either way, Nagy has picked a bad time to experiment. As he’s implementing a new offense, he’s doing it while dealing with a nasty injury to Trubisky, who’s coming off of a shoulder injury that he injured in college.

Without Trubisky, the Bears lack a very important ingredient: continuity and continuity and execution and situational-base coaching.

Add the injuries and the Bears’ offensive identity in 2018 has officially gone from a high tempo, run-first scheme to a hand-off, keep-it-simple scheme.

If there is anything to understand, it’s that the Bears are dealing with an entire coaching staff that has not served since last season ended.

If you’re an assistant coach and you went back to your organization after the last season ended, would you stay at that organization? In Chicago?

So it wasn’t a surprise to anyone when Nagy hired Bryan Harsin, who most coaches usually hire when a new general manager is brought in.

Ryan Pace was brought in via hiring the coordinators from Fangio’s staff, so a significant portion of the organization was already reeling.

In just one year as an NFL head coach, Nagy has shown to be dysfunctional in his squad’s current iteration.

Fox can take the credit if he would’ve stayed, but having two Bears assistants turn down positions in May was a mistake and a bad move.

For Chicago fans and Bears loyalists, it has been weird to watch the 2017 season become just a bad memory.

Still hopeful. Still sad. Still excited. It’s all been a bit confusing.

I’m not ready to give up on this Bears team, but I am almost ready to give up on coaching that turns out like this.

Hopefully, a little structure will be put into Nagy’s offense and it can rise up to fulfill the expectations which will be there come 2020.

Skepticism is healthy for any sports team, and no one has to understand what is wrong for Chicago Bears fans more than I do. I’m just hoping the end doesn’t arrive too fast.

Evan Coughlin’s column appears weekly on ChicagoSportsToday.com.

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