Meet the men who are ruining Britain, at the moment.

How long will British tourists need to leave before some enterprising British tabloids go looking for their next culprit? Over the last week, 17 men have been arrested in Britain on suspicion of being…

Meet the men who are ruining Britain, at the moment.

How long will British tourists need to leave before some enterprising British tabloids go looking for their next culprit? Over the last week, 17 men have been arrested in Britain on suspicion of being sex offenders travelling to Turkey, France and Belgium, following undercover operations by police focused on the commission of sex crimes. Scotland Yard has already received two reports of abuse, and “dozens” more are being investigated.

Those arrests give a sense of the international dimension of the illegal and highly lucrative sex tourism market in Britain. So far, foreign nationals have accounted for 96 percent of all arrests on the subject of child abuse in the country in the last year.

Compare the arresting success of the Metropolitan Police to the failure of the United Kingdom’s efforts in Egypt, a country that is home to the most ancient civilizations of the desert. The suicide of Stephen Griffiths, a U.K. citizen of Nigerian descent, who was accused of sending himself fake blackmail emails to female tourists, has reignited the campaign for tighter restrictions on Egypt’s visa regime. A year ago, Griffiths stabbed to death a British honeymooner he met in Luxor; his arrest coincided with the collapse of the economy in the Arab world’s most populous country. Critics note that while women are more likely to be assaulted on European routes, Egypt isn’t that much more attractive than Barcelona or Copenhagen — because little else in the country changes the face of a tourist’s travels.

A year ago, Stephen Griffiths murdered a British honeymooner he met in Luxor. A year later, child exploitation has hit Britain like never before.

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