New Yorkers eating delicious Asian dumplings in space

NASA astronaut Reid Wiseman took photographs on Oct. 20 of the dumpling peppers growing at the end of the experimental terrarium at the bottom of the ISS’s Expeditions 58/59 suite. Here is his account…

New Yorkers eating delicious Asian dumplings in space

NASA astronaut Reid Wiseman took photographs on Oct. 20 of the dumpling peppers growing at the end of the experimental terrarium at the bottom of the ISS’s Expeditions 58/59 suite. Here is his account of the experience.

In September I picked three dumpling peppers from a planter box on the floor of the US Destiny laboratory on the ISS and threw two into the container as a practice run. The first trip about 260 meters (948 feet) up into the air is a little bumpy – each one of them, after all, is really quite tiny. But some weeks later, I felt it was time to test the microgravity environment by dropping them from farther than I would normally.

After I connected the more than a dozen plants to the 60cm (2-foot) wide indoor terrarium, there were no problems attaching the plant balls to the chambers of the container. The airtight cylinder above, which resembles a high-definition camera roll with false teeth on top, is called a “Constantinople,” or Kremlin, [sic]. Even though there are no moving parts inside the cylinder and no exposed fixtures, in space it can act like a mini-pressure chamber: taking all the force exerted by the pressurized air above it and, magically, releasing pressure on the plants growing below.

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