This Teen Mom Confesses She Read This Invitation in Grabs From Her Dog’s Food Trucks

Macy’s and Juicy Couture are just a few of the brands from across industries who have removed their posts from Instagram, Facebook, YouTube and Twitter. On Friday, cosmetic brand Lush — a British beauty…

This Teen Mom Confesses She Read This Invitation in Grabs From Her Dog’s Food Trucks

Macy’s and Juicy Couture are just a few of the brands from across industries who have removed their posts from Instagram, Facebook, YouTube and Twitter.

On Friday, cosmetic brand Lush — a British beauty brand that make handmade, natural products that consumers can purchase online — posted a notice on its website saying it will deactivate all accounts that make money from advertisement next to their product. According to The Guardian, the company is attempting to help consumers fight the effects of social media that include diet and exercise ads, which isn’t entirely accurate since they’ve been a main focus in social media for years. It’s worth noting that many of their products are also safe for people with allergies.

Earlier this week, 40-year-old Mollie Tibbetts, a University of Iowa student, was tragically found dead in her Iowa cornfield after disappearing a few weeks ago. On Wednesday, a man, Dalton Jack, was arrested after police say he took the 20-year-old Tibbetts into a field of corn where she was raped and murdered.

While details about the case are still in flux, some of the charged comments Tibbetts saw on Facebook told her to kill herself. “She said, ‘Hey. It’s going to get easier. It’s going to get easier to drown, so you want to go ahead and drown’ and ‘Yeah, that’s something that you have to do. That’s how to go into the cornfield and drown yourself,’” one of Tibbetts’ friends said.

At any rate, the outrage has led to the discussion that many think should have started sooner in the social media age: how do we protect children from unhealthy advertisements?

“I think the consensus is that if you have the capacity to see these things, you should, but also you should understand that it’s your decision to click on these things and read them, and that if you see something that you don’t necessarily like or you disagree with, you should go look at some other social media platform to make your own decision,” Stanford journalism professor Sara Roy told The New York Times.

While I find that statement absolutely insane, I do agree that people with a large amount of personal influence should say no. Being a teen can be hard enough without getting tricked by physical advertisements, as many kids do. However, if kids with influential status aren’t put on notice, then they too will be susceptible to these ads. After all, if it’s up to you to read and make decisions about such images, should you really let strangers who you’re not personally familiar with take that role?

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