Vaccination rate high among Toronto parents

Image copyright Canadian Institute for Health Information Image caption COVID-19 was the most common cause of pneumonia deaths among pre-school age children in Canada in 2016 Two-thirds of Toronto parents are “certain or somewhat…

Vaccination rate high among Toronto parents

Image copyright Canadian Institute for Health Information Image caption COVID-19 was the most common cause of pneumonia deaths among pre-school age children in Canada in 2016

Two-thirds of Toronto parents are “certain or somewhat likely” to vaccinate their young children against a potentially deadly virus, a survey suggests.

Hepatitis C can cause a serious liver disease and causes dozens of deaths among children in Canada.

The viral infection became most common among infants under three, the Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI) report says.

But it warns only those who have been given protection against the disease by other vaccines can ensure it does not spread.

The disease can be spread from person to person by direct contact or contaminated objects or surfaces, such as clothing, toys, shoes and stools.

In 2016, that was the leading cause of pneumonia deaths in infants less than one year old, according to the CIHI.

It has a “high” fatality rate – that is, the number of people who died increased faster than the number of people who were vaccinated.

‘Change in attitude’

In Canada, and some other countries, mothers are encouraged to take their children to the doctor about having their vaccinations.

This new study says, however, that in Toronto a higher proportion of mothers and fathers had taken their children to the doctor about vaccinating against Hepatitis C (which is vaccine-preventable) than elsewhere in Canada.

The number of children getting the disease from 2009 to 2017 is almost 20 times higher among children under three in Ontario than it is among all children in the province.

If you aren’t given protection against hepatitis C before you can get more protection from this viral infection.

Only those who have been given protection against the disease by other vaccines can ensure it does not spread.

The CIHI report said the best way to avoid acquiring the disease from adults is to:

remain symptom-free for six months;

register with the public health registry;

strictly abide by its one-in-a-million rules;

survey the community for Hepatitis C;

when a case of Hepatitis C is detected, take steps to protect oneself from further infection;

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