Violence in Europe’s countries most viewed on CNN: Netherlands, Ireland, Germany

Written by Staff Writer Dutch Prime Minister Mark Rutte says public anger in the Netherlands is at an all-time high after several weeks of unrest by youths across the country. Public anger and frustration…

Violence in Europe's countries most viewed on CNN: Netherlands, Ireland, Germany

Written by Staff Writer

Dutch Prime Minister Mark Rutte says public anger in the Netherlands is at an all-time high after several weeks of unrest by youths across the country.

Public anger and frustration boiled over on May 26 after a soldier was shot by an Afghan soldier who had allegedly been pulled off a train by his extremist compatriots. Five Dutch soldiers were killed in the incident, one of several attacks blamed on the so-called Moro Taliban .

“We are facing a very high anger in the street in the Netherlands. Above all in Lisse [a town where one of the soldiers was killed], and other cities, where people have seen four very violent incidents in several weeks,” Rutte said on RTL Deutschland on Thursday.

“A public mood has emerged in which a large majority of people believe it’s stupid, counterproductive, criminal and immoral to be radicalized and fight for an extremist cause by either means of violence or sympathizing with that cause. The problem is getting worse all the time.”

[email protected] reacts to the death of one of the soldiers in the #Eindhoven shooting: “It’s a terrible, terrible situation.” #Dutchnationalday #Downtariddogen pic.twitter.com/gI9UpyOoXG — RTL Deutschland (@RTLDeutschland) May 26, 2019

1 of 7 A Dutch soldier carries a wounded comrade away from the scene of a shooting in Eindhoven, the Netherlands, May 26, 2019. Dutch troops opened fire on an Afghan soldier who wounded four soldiers in an attack that again illustrated the two nations’ lack of combat training in shared battlefronts across the Middle East and Europe. (AP Photo/Scott Heppell) Share this slide:

RTL

A spokesman for Rutte’s party, the Liberal Party, told the Focus magazine that the prime minister had already decided to scale back military intervention in Afghanistan, and to buy more police officers than the army needed for domestic duties.

RTL reported that over a year of public protests and a steady stream of incidents of racially motivated attacks had fueled a widespread disgust at the discrimination and alienation seen in one of Europe’s more affluent countries.

But other potential triggers for unrest are less obvious, including disagreements over immigration policy and whether new immigrants pay for some of the benefits they receive.

A police raid on an immigrant-run restaurant in the northeastern city of Amersfoort last month sparked widespread public criticism and caused Rutte to face a parliamentary revolt. The raid came after a gunfight between police and five of the restaurant’s illegal immigrants.

A public outcry ensued when a refugee was charged over the death of an allegedly drunk teenager in a dispute over a restaurant bill.

Rutte’s coalition, which he heads with the Christian Democrats, came to power in 2014 vowing to make the country “more tolerant and open,” in a sign of the growing Dutch commitment to a multicultural society.

“The idea was that we would have everyone integrating in all communities so that things like police shootings are simply not going to happen,” Dutch commentator Van Dyk Hendrikse told Focus magazine.

“Instead it’s gotten worse, and there are still so many young adults coming from poorer countries to the Netherlands. So it’s dangerous and things aren’t going to get better any time soon.”

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