Why one driver won’t forget his very good friend

By Anna Henderson | Newsweek International | A-01 On July 29, 2017 at 12:14pm, one day before Rosberg’s 43rd birthday, Lewis’ father, father-in-law, mother, sister, brothers and fellow F1 drivers and friends gathered for…

Why one driver won’t forget his very good friend

By Anna Henderson | Newsweek International | A-01

On July 29, 2017 at 12:14pm, one day before Rosberg’s 43rd birthday, Lewis’ father, father-in-law, mother, sister, brothers and fellow F1 drivers and friends gathered for a private memorial service at their childhood home in Taddle Creek Park in Hockessin, Delaware, an idyllic setting several miles from the site of his death.

In lieu of flowers, Rosberg requested that the event be a celebration of his life and career. “Florence raised us on a strict diet of positivity, curiosity, adventure, responsibility, respect, and love for life. She taught us to not take ‘no’ for an answer, to follow our dreams, to respect our elders, to try our hardest, to believe in ourselves, to care about other people, to give something back, to overcome any obstacle, and to never stop working. She has left an indelible mark in all of our lives, and with this memorial she has left a legacy for us to continue.”

Rosberg’s family asked all to light candles as a symbol of how far he had come and to remember how his life left an indelible impression on everyone in attendance. At the end of the service, Rosberg’s car from his first F1 race in 1991 was displayed on a stand for everyone to view. It was too late for fans with cars, though.

There was only one other thing a few around the track noticed as those attending the service drove by at the end of the track. They spotted a rather disturbing sight, an unoccupied and-now-empty memorial space for a man many had once called a legend in his own mind, father and friend.

Last summer, I broke a story telling you about the controversial decision to pack Florence’s headstone into the stone-built brick and mortar church by the sea. I called it a controversial decision because it raised questions of the dignity and respect of a body buried next to a building that housed children who attend the church’s school.

When she died, she was buried next to the “F1 child” in the beachfront church, but when the building was converted to a highrise in 1999, the grave was reclaimed to build more classrooms and classrooms after the government said children have a right to educational facilities.

The “F1 child”, Italian supermodel Nadja Auermann, found Florence Rosberg’s grave there in 2009. It is now a convenient place for relatives visiting from out of town for a place to leave flowers or tribute to Rosberg.

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