Canadian health officials say 1 million children may get the Canadian-made CJD vaccine

The plane carrying medicines and equipment that would begin inoculating more than 1 million children in California with the air-born virus that’s causing some premature infants to become very sick touched down in Canada…

Canadian health officials say 1 million children may get the Canadian-made CJD vaccine

The plane carrying medicines and equipment that would begin inoculating more than 1 million children in California with the air-born virus that’s causing some premature infants to become very sick touched down in Canada on Monday, according to the Ministry of Health in Ontario.

The vaccine, or PARV for short, is aimed at stopping the most severe cases of breathing problems and extremely premature births due to the CJD variant, known as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, that affects the brain. If administered at birth, the viruses help prevent brain damage and death, but have a lower amount of proteins that help them grow.

The medicines, as well as equipment, arrived Monday morning in Hamilton, Ontario, before continuing to Canada’s highest-risk areas.

“The full deployment plan is a coordinated effort involving provincial and territorial ministries of health, vaccine manufacturers, health care workers, First Nations organizations, nurse educators, aboriginal organizations, child-care organizations, and other organizations and individuals that work with the children at risk of the disease,” a statement from the Ministry of Health said.

The CA$4.3 million shipment brings the total to more than 50,000 doses that have been flown out of the country, the Canadian Press reported.

“It brings much-needed comfort to parents, grandparents and others affected by this terrifying disease,” said Ontario Health Minister Eric Hoskins.

The vaccination is available for all babies born in Ontario after Aug. 1, 2015, and is expected to start immediately. The province will begin screening new babies before deliveries in newborn units.

A human immunodeficiency virus vaccine has been administered to more than 100,000 children in Ontario. But CJD caused by mutated versions of the HIV virus has decreased significantly in a number of European countries and parts of Asia in recent years.

The condition can afflict children and young adults as young as 16, which means the Canadian health department is trying to prevent it from spreading to all future generations, the ministry said.

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