Unforgettable moments in newspaper history, edited by James M. Lindsay – extract

There are tens of thousands of us whose copies of The Wall Street Journal, of The New York Times are still in pristine condition. Our opinion of the financial industry has turned upside down,…

Unforgettable moments in newspaper history, edited by James M. Lindsay – extract

There are tens of thousands of us

whose copies of The Wall Street Journal,

of The New York Times

are still in pristine condition.

Our opinion of the financial industry

has turned upside down,

and every yellowed issue

of any of the major retail chains

is now right in front of us.

We complain like wiselings

about Wall Street’s payoffs

and express our contempt

for “securitisation,”

the vast variety of credit

security that has been trawled up

in order to make some money.

Calls and emails come

in constantly,

and the telephone machine

is still functioning.

Most people who own these

newspapers, we

think, would have

left them simply a few years

ago.

But we did not.

We figure that owning

these papers, now, would in no way help

to resolve our many

problems.

Oddly,

the daily papers

stand out as the only industry that

has not been diverted

from their mission,

while the chain stores have

fallen into the shadow of

their distant cousins, the banks.

Many newspapers still work

hard, striving to remain

right on top of their news

customers, whose loyalty,

to some extent, we hold dear.

We’ve always struggled

to write a good front page,

we’ve never stopped us from

investing in a worthy job,

we don’t just go slumming

in the yellow pages.

We know that we are the cause

of our own troubles,

and we will be able to help

many people out

when we succeed.

We are sad, indeed, to see

our cousins struggling so much.

Our city has problems.

We are saddened.

But not discouraged.

Reuniting Our City

Shapiro, Jane

[Chicago Tribune, 18 July 2010]

Leave a Comment