Your flu jab has just gotten better, science says

Scientists at Cambridge University have made huge gains in preventing the bacteria Gram-negative from multiplying. Efficacy comes in the form of two antibodies which bind to, and prevent entry into, a part of the…

Your flu jab has just gotten better, science says

Scientists at Cambridge University have made huge gains in preventing the bacteria Gram-negative from multiplying.

Efficacy comes in the form of two antibodies which bind to, and prevent entry into, a part of the body called microviral receptor gamma-4 (MRGF-4), commonly found in the immune system and thought to be responsible for inhibiting the production of Gram-negative cells.

The researchers showed that patients with such a condition were twice as likely to respond to the antibody treatment (a group of 1,266 individuals) when they were also given the flu jab.

The study, published on Dec. 20 in the Lancet, used UK national records to see which patients were most at risk of developing Coven-19, a naturally occurring infection of human plasma produced from people with diabetes, which begins with rapid inflammation and infection of the lymph nodes, liver and kidneys. Coven-19 is a life-threatening and associated lymphadenopathy with opportunistic infections, according to the researchers.

First author Prof. Tim Harcourt said: “This finding opens up significant potential to stop Gram-negative infection in the early stages, when it’s harder to treat, and before it spreads and becomes life-threatening.”

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